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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
gwen moore, democrat from wisconsin. she was a staunch supporter of rice amid the republican criticism. and joan walsh, editor at large of salon.com and an msnbc political analyst. thank you both for being here tonight. >> thank you, reverend. >> thank you, reverend sharpton. >> congresswoman, what is your reaction to ambassador rice's announcement? >> i can tell you, i'm saddened. i'm enraged. this was always a fabricated, trumped up allegation. this, you know, not very briegt, there's not enough time on this program to walk through her tremendous accomplishments over the last 20 years in public service. i think that the republicans see an opportunity to have senator kerry appointed as secretary of state. and be able to rup a special election off cycle to be able to -- to win john kerry's seet in massachusetts. as you might remember, president obama sort of blew romney away in massachusetts. 60% to about 39%. and it was a little bit closer with the elizabeth, warren brown race. 63% to maybe about 43%. so all throughout these trumped up charges of her not being very bright and trustwor
between house speaker boehner and president obama. with stephen moore of the "wall street journal" and later the author of "columbine" and what we have learned from that tragedy and how it applies to the shooting in connecticut. >> i called on congress today to act immediately on what is appropriate to put armed police officers in every single school in this nation. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> the headline in this morning's baltimore sun reflects those across the country. from the tribune's washington magazine, it's said when he weight in friday he delivered a lashing speech that included violent movies and video games as he said his plan would train those to guard our schools. in this edition of today's program, we're going to begin the first 45 minutes of the program to talk about the nra's response to the shootings. they broke their silence yesterday with executive director and vice president wayne. we'll talk more about what he had to say. but we want to get you involved in the conversation
, prejudice or what, but a major battle at moore's creek, north carolina, not far from wilmington, north carolina. a british fleet was going to land soldiers at wilmington, and an army formed inland, marching towards the coast to join up with the british regulars. a force that were rebels, but what we call patriots, intercepted them and massacred them at moore's creek, which is -- a blind gull issue where rebels were wait r for them to wipe them out. without the loyalists support, the british troops couldn't land keeping the south free of british control for a few years until they landed at charleston. yes, sir? >> you mentioned that the boston tea party spread south to new york and to other cities. almost sounds as though were the network of people who were having the same thought or inspired one way or the another or working together. i never thought of the boston tea party as being that, but is that really -- >> yes. sam adams set up because there was no other form of communication, set up a series of committees of correspondence in every major city in the country. they started commun
to on today's show. we don't -- for-god's sake gwen moore i love her, on the big show, and sexy liberal john fugelsang who is on that very special tonight in hour number three. >> yes. >> stephanie: let's go to doug in st. charles. you are on the "stephanie miller show." hi, doug. >> caller: good morning. >> stephanie: hi go ahead. >> caller: this is a set up for jim. >> stephanie: okay. >> caller: this is a setup for jim. i had read a study -- a book on comparative ideologies and when they talk about the fascist party some of the things that stand out is disbelief in science, propaganda which they found radio is the most effective form of it. they went to radio. and it's kind of funny because there's like seven or eight different things on it but each one of them describes the republican party today. >> the original [ inaudible ] in italy, the corporatist party. >> correct. correct. >> stephanie: exactly. oh by the way, greg writes about reince preibus, gym! >> reinholt reince prebus! [ dog barking ] >> i never thought we would use that sound bite. >> stephanie: they want m
on what is already a fragile economic recovery. stephen moore joins us. when economic growth was comparatively pretty good, this the president said no, now you don't want to raise tax rates because the economy is fragile. gdp is worse now, is that? >> i think almost exactly two years ago, the president said the economy is too fragile to raise taxes on anyone. so what you have essentially was a deal that was put together. remember back in december of 2010 when we were facing a very similar situation where they agreed to extend all the tax cuts for two years. by the way, that is why we are facing this new fiscal cliff. it is infuriating to business owners. i have been talking to a lot of them last couple of weeks. this is banana republic type of politics. no one knows what it will look like. it makes it impossible for businesses to do planning, purchasing equipment, hiring workers. you are seeing the impact on the stock market already where we have a lousy 10 days with stocks because everybody is in this kind of state of fear and trepidation that we are going to go over this cl
. >> this is one of those call your congressman moments. we have gwen moore having written a letter december 11th to congressional leaders. send a reauthorization bill to the president that he can sign immediately, right? gwen moore sent that. some republicans signed on to it. is this a moment where we publicize the names of the congressmen doing it? sorry, we have to go to newtown, connecticut where police are holding a news conference with the updates on friday's shooting. >> we have been working through the night. detectives are at the scenes of the school, the secondary scene. we are actively working those areas. there's nothing new to report relative to the investigation. it is moving forward. as i said yesterday and i will not and cannot detail pieces of the investigation, but i can tell you that we have recovered evidence contrary to some of the news reports out there. we have recovered evidence that is being analyzed. the weaponry involved, we are tracing them back to the workbench when they were assembled. information is being examined and looked at with our federal partners. in addition
moore joins us. keep it right here on "morning joe." at optionsxpress we're all about options trading. we create easy to use, powerful trading tools for all. look at these streaming charts! they're totally customizable and they let you visualize what might happen next. that's genius! strategies, chains, positions. we put 'em all on one screen! could we make placing a trade any easier? mmmm...could we? open an account today and get a free 13-month e ibd™ subscription when you call 1-888-280-0157 now. optionsxpress by charles schwab. >>> 39 past the hour. the second longest serving senator in u.s. history, democrat daniel en inoue died yesterday from respiratory complications. president obama praised the world war ii medal of honor recipient as an american hero. you had insights. >> his family had been in hawaii since the late 1800s and pearl harbor happened and dan rushed down to the harbor to treat his fellow americans with the training he got in first-aid and then when we were sending japanese americans to internment camps he volunteered for the 42ed. when he was on the dock leavin
world. terrence moore is her, sports contribute to cnn.com and writer for mlb.com. let's start now. we're going to start with adrian peterson. adrian peterson, all right? running back for the minnesota vikings. making a run at the single season rushing record, a great achievement, but what makes his season such an amazing comeback? >> this guy is absolutely insane what he's doing, okay? tomorrow, don, marks the one-year anniversary of this guy severely busting up his left knee. three weeks after surgery, he was walking. eight weeks after surgery he was sprinting. now he's just amazing. you talk about the record, but more realistic than that, 100 yards rushing next week against the green bay packers, this guy will become only the seventh rusher ever to run for more than 2,000 yards in a given season. that's a lot. >> with a busted knee. >> at 27. could you do that? >> i couldn't do it with two good knees, some help, and another running back pushing me along with a go-cart, i so couldn't do that. let's turn the page now and talk about head coach of the indianapolis colts diagnosed with l
. this is the 2012 claude moore lecture, journalists roger mudd moderates a panel discussion on what so proudly we hail, the messages of the war of 1812. tonight we are privileged to hear two distinguished guests discuss the past, present and future of the united states constitution. akhil reed amar has joined yale university where he teaches constitutional law at the college and the law school. he received both his b.a. and j.d. from yale and serves as an editor for the yale law's journal. after clerking for stephen breyer when he was judge of the u.s. court of appeals for the first circuit professor amar joined the faculty of yale in 1985. professor amar is a coeditor of the leading constitutional law casebook, decision-decision- making and is th author of several other books including the constitution and criminal procedure, the bill of rights creation and reconstruction, america's constitution a biography and most recently america's unwritten constitution, the president's and decibels we live by. the honorable clarence thomas has served as an associate justice of the supreme court of the unite
sustain the one-two punch is anybody's question. patti ann: joining us now is steve moore from the "wall street journal." hopefully he can give us some answers. good morning, steve. what is the most immediate impact in we go over the cliff? >> we are talking about january 2nd taxing rising on over a hundred million americans. this is a big sock to the wallet of americans of every income group. let's just talk about the middle class for a minute. for those earning about 45 to 75,000 a year they are looking at paying somewhere in the neighborhood of $2,500 a year more in taxes. it's not just the warn buffets and bill gates that will be hit by tax increases. the other part of the cliff that we don't talk that much about is the automatic spending cuts would take effect starting on january 2nd, an 8% reduction in major spending categories, national defense, many of what we call the domestic discretionary programs would also be hit. this is a big fiscal wallop to the economy and a lot of economists believe it could cause a double-dip recession. patti ann: on the other hand we are hearing from
with demi moore. her husband, ashton kutcher recently filed for divorce even though they've been separated for some time. that surprised her? >> yes. it was a year since they split. you know, it's been a very rocky year for demi moore. she turned 50, sources say she's really unhappy about aging and you can see that ashton wasn't the only young guy in her life. she's chased after voito schnabel. most disturbingly -- here she is partying away with stacey keebler who is 33. >> wasn't she running around like a little cat. >> that was kim kardashian maybe. >> demi, she's become estranged from her three daughters, especially her middle daughter, scout. she really has a very tough relationship with those girls right now. she even sat apart from them at the oldest -- youngest one's graduation earlier this year. demi's having a very hard time. >> let's hope she gets it together in 2013. meanwhile, let's talk a little bit about what you're calling the twilight cheating scandal. >> it wasn't just me calling it but "us weekly" did call that story, the biggest story of the year. we ran photos in the ma
to the aflac trivia question, julianne moore. that makes sense. the winner katherine savage from san antonio, texas. congratulations. meanwhile, we've become used to the media frenzy surrounding high profile celebrity court cases like casey anthony and o. j. simpson, case where is people follow every move the lawyers make and every word the witnesses say. what about average americans who aren't celebrities, who are facing justice by a jury of their peers? what are those cases really like? our next guest made it his mission to find out. he's spending a year in a small courtroom in new england, joining us, the best selling author of "fatal vision" and other books, joe gothic. >> good morning. >> steve: so 15 gothic street is the street address of the superior court courtroom in massachusetts. >> north hampton. >> steve: so what you decided to do is you were going to spend a year there just watching the everyday stuff that doesn't get the headlines. >> exactly. and write a book in serial form. this is the new approach i'm taking because the old publishing model just doesn't work anymore. and th
? >> brian: who is that next guest? i believe it's ryan moore, the ceo and founder of rebo innovation. >> yeah. >> gretchen: he's here to show you how you can work out from the comfort of your own desk. how did you come up with the idea? >> close friend of ours passed away from cancer. we were inspired to join 100-mile, three mountain bicycle challenge. but we needed to train. we were having a hard time running our business, getting our work done while cycling indoors and training. so we looked for a device that would allow to us mount or computers, but nothing existed, so we made our own. after training for the event exclusively using what we made and riding it, we thought hey, this is a great idea. it really works. >> steve: it really does work. and brian was talking earlier about how when he works out at the gym, he's always reading. but what i've noticed is, and this is great because you've got a laptop here -- is it's often shaky. so it's hard to read. if you come up with this desk thing, foamy and i'm sure nasa helped you develop it, the computer stays absolutely rock steady whi
secured the movie rights. you'll remember julianne moore played sarah palin in the first film. >>> not natural and not safe either. coming up, an eye opening look at the dangers of synthetic pot. >> announcer: you never know when, but thieves can steal your identity and turn your life upside down. >> hi. >> hi. you know, i can save you 15% today if you open up a charge card account with us. >> you just read my mind. >> announcer: just one little piece of information and they can open bogus accounts, stealing your credit, your money and ruining your reputation. that's why you need lifelock to relentlessly protect what matters most... [beeping...] helping stop crooks before your identity is attacked. and now you can have the most comprehensive identity theft protection available today... lifelock ultimate. so for protection you just can't get anywhere else, get lifelock ultimate. >> i didn't know how serious identity theft was until i lost my credit and eventually i lost my home. >> announcer: credit monitoring is not enough, because it tells you after the fact, sometimes as muc
on what we know today. >> steven moore before we open it up to question. glenn mentioned corporate tax reform earlier. warren buffett says that tax rates don't matter of as much as a lot of people pretend, when it comes to companies that and investments and innovation. i suspect you disagree with him. >> it seems at odds with the buffett rule, which suggests that taxes are important. >> for government to have revenue? >> business people oftentimes say that it does not matter. then you get one level of analysis beneath that and they wake up, which is that you are given a spread sheet. if you're on a board, you are given a result. in the calculation that creates that result, there's a whole lot of things like taxes and other costs. if you run sensitivities on analyses based on different formulas you get different outcomes. it's not that it's not important, but you are looking at a broader conclusions rather than getting into the actual details. >> to encourage innovation, what would you do? >> taxes are imbedded in the analysis and people just don't recognize it. second, we have a corpor
security analyst ryan moore. ryan good to have you on the show. five that you outline and i want to make sure we get to all five. start with the israel or iranian conflict, will that heat up. >> sure. israel has to stop or delay it and iran presidential election and when there is a political crisis you pick a fight with israel. >> eric: we need to point out not the president of iran that has the power but the mullahs. >> right. >> eric: chaos in syria spread? >> it is already spreading. al-qaida operatives trying to carry out terrorist attack in jordan and face a, the dictator that is a proxy of iran and fighting militants and muslim brotherhood. >> eric: how does it theten america. >> this is a stronghold for al-qaida there. is plenty of good rebel to work with and we didn't . secular rebels don't control what is happening on the ground. >> eric: serious threat. middle eastern oil turmoil. what can happen. >> everyone focus on the conflict of iran and israel. but there is a conflict between saudi arabia and iran . the fact that iranian tried to launch a cyber attack. shows that saudi ar
an introduction, shelly moore capito. >> i knew following mario was going to be a problem. but anyway, thank you all for being here. i want to thank the families and the young children who are here. i come from a different viewpoint. i do have a grandchild and i see this through her eyes and the debt that christie talked about is very daunting for her. but i'm also in that middle generation where i'm caring for my parents. they're heavily reliant on medicare and social security and me and our family to support them. and i understand how important those safety net programs are for them. but for these children, if we don't take the opportunity that we have this week, this month, to look at those programs so that when these children are the age of my parents and their children are trying to figure out how to meet those heavy costs of their health care, we will have missed an opportunity that would be unforgivable. and so for my parents, my grandchild and for me and for all the parents and grandchildren and caregivers in this country, we must come with this commonsense plan, we can't ask people arou
for today, ms. gwen moore of wisconsin for today, mr. reyes of texas and mr. terry of texas for today. the speaker pro tempore: the speaker pro tempore: without objection. all requests are granted. for what purpose does the gentleman from california rise? ms. pelosi: i ask that the house do now adjourn. the speaker pro tempore: the question is on the motion to adjourn. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. the motion is adopted. the house stands adjourned u time of great desolation. no torment shall touch them. we ask your blessing upon the members of this assembly and especially upon the leadership. it is upon their shoulders the most important negotiations have been placed. give them insight and courage to forge an agreement that allows us all to move toward encouraging future. now made this before your greater honor and memory. -- made this before your greater honor and memory. come to order. the chaplain, dr. barry black, will lead the senate in prayer. the chaplain: let us pray. almighty and everlasting god, in whom we live and move and have our being, as w
liver moore and this was precell phone day. remember the pagers? and i paged lowell wood. he was in washington and he -- within an hour he was sitting in my office. electromagnetic pulse. we have only one brief experience with it in our country. and that was in 1962 and johnston island, the only time we ever debt nailted a weapon above the atmosphere. we had no idea what would happen. it produced an electromagnetic pulse because a lot of disturbances in hawaii which is about 800 miles away. the soviets had a lot more experience than we. they actually developed -- we designed them but never built them, enhanced e.m.p. weapons. a single large nuclear -- i shouldn't say that. because it doesn't have to be a large bomb. because it could be a relatively small bomb that's e.m.p.-enhanced. a single appropriately bomb detonated three miles high over nebraska or iowa would prank et our whole country and -- blanket our whole country and if the e.m.p. lay down was robust enough, it would essentially fry all of our microelectronics. the grid would be down for a year or more. and your car
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)